Cross stitch pattern Grimm's fairy tale - Hansel and Gretel

Cross stitch pattern Grimm's fairy tale - Hansel and Gretel

8,33 €

GRI_PDC_GRI_03

Hansel and Gretel fairy tale pattern chart



Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's fairy tale : Hansel and Gretel.
Pattern to embroider in cross stitch or in petit point.

Each of the patterns in this series dedicated to Grimm's fairy tales. On one side a version of the motif in colour and on the other side, the same motif in unicolour. The instruction sheet contains the paragraph that it illustrates in the tale.

Size of this motif: 90 x 90 points.

- When using 12 count embroidery linen and sewing over 2 threads, the finished piece will measure 15cm each side.
- Sewing over 2 threads using
16 count linen, your piece will measure 11.3cm each side. 
- Sewing over 5.5 count Aida, your piece will measure 16.5cm each side.

Don’t forget to leave a border around your embroidery!

For the multicolour version, 18 colours of thread are needed. Our recommendations for the colours with our Retors du Nord thread: 2317, 2223, 2780, 2549, 2033, 2445, 2037, 2001, 2005, 2348, 2443, 2350, 2302, 2043, 2190, 2221, 2012 and 2041.

Our patterns are all printed on large format paper (29,7 x 42) and are very easy to follow.Our patterns are presented in pretty printed folders, the colours vary according to our stocks. The interior of the folders have printed reminders of the basic embroidery stitches.

Thread and fabric not supplied.

Special letter tariff for this product.
Attention: the letter tariff is only applicable for certain products.
The shipment costs are automatically calculated on confirmation of your order.
NB: The letter rate cannot be tracked, so we cannot be responsible for delays or losses.
Check your address: the shipment label is printed following the informations you fill in.

 

...when they came nearer they saw that the house
was built of bread,
and roofed with cakes; and the window
was of transparent sugar.
"We will have some of this," said Hansel,
"and make a fine meal.
I will eat a piece of the roof,
Grethel, and you can have some of the
window-that will taste sweet."
So Hansel reached up and broke off a bit of the roof,
just to see how it tasted,
and Grethel stood
by the window and gnawed at it.
Then they heard a thin voice
call out from inside,
"Nibble, nibble, like a mouse,
Who is nibbling at my house?"
And the children answered,
"Never mind, It is the wind."
And they went on eating,
never disturbing themselves. Hansel,
who found that the roof tasted very nice,
took down a great piece of it,
and Grethel pulled out a large round window-pane,
and sat her down and began upon it.
Then the door opened, and an aged woman came out,
leaning upon a crutch.
Hansel and Grethel felt very frightened,
and let fall what they had in their hands.
The old woman, however,
nodded her head, and said,
"Ah, my dear children,
how come you here?
you must come indoors and stay with me,
you will be no trouble."
So she took them each by the hand,
and led them into her little house.
And there they found a good meal laid out,
of milk and pancakes, with sugar,
apples, and nuts.
After that she showed them two little white beds,
and Hansel and Grethel laid themselves down on them,
and thought they were in heaven.
The old woman, although her behaviour was so kind,
was a wicked witch, who lay in wait for children,
and had built the little house on purpose to entice them.
When they were once inside she used to kill them,
cook them, and eat them,
and then it was a feast day with her.
The witch's eyes were red,
and she could not see very far,
but she had a keen scent,
like the beasts, and knew very well
when human creatures were near.
When she knew that Hansel and Grethel were coming,
she gave a spiteful laugh,
and said triumphantly,
"I have them, and they shall not escape me!"
Early in the morning,
before the children were awake,
she got up to look at them,
and as they lay sleeping so peacefully
with round rosy cheeks, she said to herself,
"What a fine feast I shall have!"
Then she grasped Hansel with her withered hand,
and led him into a little stable,
and shut him up behind a grating...

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

Hansel and Gretel